The Wayne’s Sink Site: A Submerged Quarry in the Aucilla River, Northwest Florida

Stone, bone, and ivory artifacts recovered from displaced context within the Aucilla River are often surficially discolored and described colloquially by Florida researchers as “stained” or “patinated.” Geologically, these two terms describe very different chemical weathering processes. To determine the cause of the Aucilla River discoloration, statistical analysis of geochemical data was combined with microscopic analysis of chert thin sections. Based on these analyses, it has been determined that artifacts within the Aucilla River are subjected to staining through the diffusion and oxidization of iron coupled with surficial deposition and oxidization of manganese. The thin sections above illustrate the visual effects of these process. Notice how staining normally manifests in a black or dark brown color. In thin section, however, it is clear the iron diffusion and oxidization results in the colloidal rust-colored stain; the dark coloration visible on the exterior of artifacts is likely oxidized manganese coupled with limited light reflection. 

Oh and also see some sweet microfossils!

The Wayne’s SInk Site: A Submerged Quarry in the Aucilla River, Northwest Florida

The chert outcrop at Wayne’s Sink was only accessible to Paleoindian and Early Archaic peoples, after which it was inundated by rising sea and aquifer levels. Evidence of past quarrying activity is still visible on the limestone outcrop. Biface and tool fragments, unifacial flake tools, cores, retouched flakes, and utilized flakes were present within the collection. Still, tools represented only 1.08% of the lithic artifact assemblage, indicating that chert procurement and early stage lithic reduction were the primary forms of human activity at the site. 

prettydeadstuff:

Teeth!

Did these come out of a Florida river?

I’m going to try to post some photos tonight. I’ve been shovelbumming and revising my draft but I haven’t forgotten you!

aehtela:

rhamphotheca:

Pleistocene epoch map showing the extent of pluvial lakes in the northwestern United States, around 17,500 years before present, and directions of in- and outflows, including the flood released by Lake Bonneville. The most recent version this lake formed about 32,000 years ago, and at its peak it covered an area similar to Lake Michigan. Contemporary remnants include Great Salt Lake and Utah Lake.
 Map: Fallschirmjäger
(via: Wikipedia)

casethejointfirst

Life was simpler in the desert.

aehtela:

rhamphotheca:

Pleistocene epoch map showing the extent of pluvial lakes in the northwestern United States, around 17,500 years before present, and directions of in- and outflows, including the flood released by Lake Bonneville. The most recent version this lake formed about 32,000 years ago, and at its peak it covered an area similar to Lake Michigan. Contemporary remnants include Great Salt Lake and Utah Lake.

Map: Fallschirmjäger

(via: Wikipedia)

casethejointfirst

Life was simpler in the desert.

aehtela:

casethejointfirst

I can’t believe someone would post a picture of me on the Internet without my permission.

All joking aside, I think I’ve managed 8 hours of sleep since Monday.

Draft goes out tonight.

Prepare for my triumphant return.

True friends are those who allow you to talk about your passions more than is conversationally appropriate

staticstrife, sammeh, whoisbobx, gregoryboyd1, aehtela

Thank you friends.

Does anyone know of a brick-and-mortar store that sells photo documentation scales in metric?

Help!!

Thesis cheering section.

Thesis cheering section.