ruralarchaeologist:

oosik:

casethejointfirst:

oosik:

zomganthro:

ruralarchaeologist:

If you ever wanted to know how we do winter archaeology the answer is a cement saw, some feed bags, a pick axe and lots of muscle! This was actually taken last spring so there isn’t very much snow (nor is it very cold) but you get the idea.

Canadian CRM is badass

Alaskan archaeologists opt to hibernate during the winter. Though if it’s vital, we’ll use weed burners to soften up the ground. Hats off to you, ya crazy Canadians.

Yeah but how much of the dirt that is so hard that the had to SAW IT were they able to screen??

It is possible to take the frozen sediment back to the lab for screening. CRM is all about pandering to the client (cost), yet still being able to do justice to the resource. For we archaeologists in Alaska, the problem is usually that this methodology is cost prohibitive. And, sure, with this process you could make sawdust of some artifacts, but what’s really the difference between that and jamming a shovel into the dirt hoping to miss that same artifact? A clean cut versus an ugly snap?

Hey everyone new! I’ve already discussed how we screen and process the soil on a previous reblog of this post so I’ll just copy and paste my answer again and hopefully clear up a few of the questions you all have about archaeology in the NW: It’s very different from summer archaeology, and very VERY different from academic archaeology. The point of commercial archaeology is to locate sites within a development, so that we can avoid them. We aren’t testing to learn more about a specific site. We are using the least invasive methods available (and within reason and price range) to selectively test high potential features to prove the existence of a site. We often refuse to test truly high potential features during the winter, as well. Once that is established we petition to the Archaeology Branch and advise the client to avoid the area, and the large buffer zone that we associate with it. You also tend to pick-axe in natural layers, so it ends up being more similar to summer archaeology than one would think. Once fieldwork is done, the soil is brought back in numbered bags (which correspond to a numbered site diagram) to be defrosted over several days. Once dried and defrosted the soil is sieved by hand through screens. If an artifact is recovered (generally only flakes) then we know exactly what test pit it came from and from which test area! Testing is different than excavation because we are using a grid method to just sample an area. We are trying to establish if there is a site, without destroying the site, and the information associated. It’s not about stratigraphy but rather about the location in general. The good news is that if a clovis point were to pop out (highly irregular) we would SEE it in the field. If further information is required we do excavate in long trenches. Either the excavation is done by building excavation tents and using large industrial heaters, and heat blankets OR we wait until the thaw, and excavate in better weather. Unfortunately, we can’t avoid winter testing, because the government regulates archaeology. My first winter, I was afraid that we might saw through an artifact, but no one I’ve ever met has done that. You can always feel when you hit a rock and usually stop to check it out. But, at least in Canada, before doing ANY development you have to call us in. That’s a huge plus in my opinion, unlike a lot of other countries. It’s not a perfect system, but at least there is a system. I hope that answers some questions people might have! I think I made a vlog about winter testing a while back but if there’s a lot of interest I can always record a “how to” for Canadian winter testing.

I totally missed the feedbags section of the original posts.

Long live progress, long live archaeology.

oosik:

(Original post)
Actually, that was the only time I’ve gotten paid to be in the water. Well… where the project entailed being in the water. And we were only snorkeling. I can’t even imagine trying to work for the feds (National Park Service - NPS) with all the insurance paperwork they’d put you through for diving (when not permanently employed with them). I dove with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in 2009 (unpaid) and even that was a paperwork nightmare.
That and you also have to realize that the nearest decompression chamber is a float plane away from Agiak Lake to Bettles, then another puddle jumper back to Fairbanks. I forget how many hours that is for just flight time but then you have to factor in the satellite phone call and all the other logistics to get a pilot back out there including the “Bush time” that is inherent in seemingly everyone once getting out of town and off the road system. (Meaning things just take a little longer.)
However, once I’m done with my thesis I do plan on attempting to make submerged cultural resources a higher priority for the State of Alaska. I’ve already started a dialog with the people at the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) to see what I can do to facilitate this. But as has been pointed out, if it’s not already standard protocl, there is really no way to get any private entity to go above and beyond the law. It’s the federal government with their funding and permitting that can hook a client into upping the bar for what is considered a “good faith effort” for identifying cultural remains within the project area.
But Alaska does have much opportunity with it’s 33,000 miles (53.000km) of coastline which is more than that of the rest of the Lower 48 combined. And there’s that little thing called Beringia out there waiting to be looked over, but unless we can get people excited about this idea of learning about our heritage or expressing it as really good PR, it’s not going to happen because just getting out there is so cost prohibitive. And even though there are companies out there that can fund these projects, who are potentially disturbing these cultural resources at a huge profit *cough oil cough*, there’s really nothing that can push them into being the altruistic entity that we all hoped they would be.

Snorkeling at Agiak.

I’ve been paid for diving on a few projects. It’s great fun, but it does eventually get to the point where it’s like part of the commute. You have to gear up and commute 30’ underwater to your job. Very little of it is similar to recreational diving. You’re often overweighted so as to remain stationary, you have your fins removed to reduce your effect on the bottom and other dive teams, and you sometimes just sit around while your teammate frantically works, and then you switch tasks. For submerged prehistoric excavations, it’s essentially a terrestrial excavation minus the screening of buckets and buckets of dirt (long live the dredge!).Now for the plus sides: Curious fish and crabs will come to check out what you’re doing, and will sometimes live in the excavation units for days at a time (like their terrestrial equivalent the archaeological mouse). You can walk around on the bottom of a river like you’re on the moon, and it is great fun. Phase I underwater survey is AMAZING. That’s the closest to recreational diving, although you’re encouraged to search the overburden for intact sediment or displaced bone and artifacts. My favorite part of doing underwater archaeology (beyond finding awesome stuff in a unique setting) is using a suction dredge to remove overburden from the river bottom. I’ve had dives where I have zero visibility for over a solid hour due to particles in suspension resulting from stirring up the bottom. These moments are very cathartic. All you see are the always changing and never-ending dark brown swirls of water and leaves. It’s staring into the void.

oosik:

(Original post)

Actually, that was the only time I’ve gotten paid to be in the water. Well… where the project entailed being in the water. And we were only snorkeling. I can’t even imagine trying to work for the feds (National Park Service - NPS) with all the insurance paperwork they’d put you through for diving (when not permanently employed with them). I dove with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in 2009 (unpaid) and even that was a paperwork nightmare.

That and you also have to realize that the nearest decompression chamber is a float plane away from Agiak Lake to Bettles, then another puddle jumper back to Fairbanks. I forget how many hours that is for just flight time but then you have to factor in the satellite phone call and all the other logistics to get a pilot back out there including the “Bush time” that is inherent in seemingly everyone once getting out of town and off the road system. (Meaning things just take a little longer.)

However, once I’m done with my thesis I do plan on attempting to make submerged cultural resources a higher priority for the State of Alaska. I’ve already started a dialog with the people at the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) to see what I can do to facilitate this. But as has been pointed out, if it’s not already standard protocl, there is really no way to get any private entity to go above and beyond the law. It’s the federal government with their funding and permitting that can hook a client into upping the bar for what is considered a “good faith effort” for identifying cultural remains within the project area.

But Alaska does have much opportunity with it’s 33,000 miles (53.000km) of coastline which is more than that of the rest of the Lower 48 combined. And there’s that little thing called Beringia out there waiting to be looked over, but unless we can get people excited about this idea of learning about our heritage or expressing it as really good PR, it’s not going to happen because just getting out there is so cost prohibitive. And even though there are companies out there that can fund these projects, who are potentially disturbing these cultural resources at a huge profit *cough oil cough*, there’s really nothing that can push them into being the altruistic entity that we all hoped they would be.

image

Snorkeling at Agiak.

I’ve been paid for diving on a few projects. It’s great fun, but it does eventually get to the point where it’s like part of the commute. You have to gear up and commute 30’ underwater to your job.

Very little of it is similar to recreational diving. You’re often overweighted so as to remain stationary, you have your fins removed to reduce your effect on the bottom and other dive teams, and you sometimes just sit around while your teammate frantically works, and then you switch tasks. For submerged prehistoric excavations, it’s essentially a terrestrial excavation minus the screening of buckets and buckets of dirt (long live the dredge!).

Now for the plus sides: Curious fish and crabs will come to check out what you’re doing, and will sometimes live in the excavation units for days at a time (like their terrestrial equivalent the archaeological mouse). You can walk around on the bottom of a river like you’re on the moon, and it is great fun. Phase I underwater survey is AMAZING. That’s the closest to recreational diving, although you’re encouraged to search the overburden for intact sediment or displaced bone and artifacts.

My favorite part of doing underwater archaeology (beyond finding awesome stuff in a unique setting) is using a suction dredge to remove overburden from the river bottom. I’ve had dives where I have zero visibility for over a solid hour due to particles in suspension resulting from stirring up the bottom. These moments are very cathartic. All you see are the always changing and never-ending dark brown swirls of water and leaves. It’s staring into the void.

theolduvaigorge:

CNN Turns a Boring Royal Visit Into a Racist Nightmare in Just 13 Seconds [with appalling video footage]
by  Esther Bergdahl
“How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare? About 13 seconds it turns out, and that’s only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro.
Earlier this month, Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and chubby-cheeked baby George took their first visit overseas. There’s not much to say about royal trips abroad, aside from cute playdate photos with the commoners, but CNN, bless their hearts, found a way to make us sit up and wonder what century they belong in. Because if there’s anything Americans are good at, it’s finding new and horrible ways to make honoring indigenous traditions and experiencing other cultures about weird dances, things that baffle white people and butts.
You’ve got to watch this and see for yourself how bad it gets. Just when you think the segment has peaked, it expands the scope of its awfulness. Not just satisfied with comparing the traditional dances of Maori warriors (including those who welcomed former first lady Laura Bush during a visit to soldiers in Afghanistan) to Chippendales and horny emus, Moos gleefully highlights diplomats and world leaders “going native.”
Yeah, she actually said that.
So, how long does it take for CNN to transform into your weird, clueless right-wing relative who’s just discovered chain emails? About two minutes, it looks like. And if you need more, you’re in luck: CNN has a playlist available for your delectation called “The Wacky World of Jeanne Moos.”
***”Can you image people being active participants in their own cultures in their own lands? How utterly barbaric!”  -British Colonialism (representing cultural and literal genocide, rape, economic exploitation and theft since the 15th century)
****And its bastard offspring the American CNN reporter.
(Source: PolicyMic via @MarcKissel on Twitter)

Thank you CNN for finding a way to minimize an amazing honor and great ceremony.

theolduvaigorge:

CNN Turns a Boring Royal Visit Into a Racist Nightmare in Just 13 Seconds [with appalling video footage]

  • by  Esther Bergdahl

How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare? About 13 seconds it turns out, and that’s only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro.

Earlier this month, Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and chubby-cheeked baby George took their first visit overseas. There’s not much to say about royal trips abroad, aside from cute playdate photos with the commoners, but CNN, bless their hearts, found a way to make us sit up and wonder what century they belong in. Because if there’s anything Americans are good at, it’s finding new and horrible ways to make honoring indigenous traditions and experiencing other cultures about weird dances, things that baffle white people and butts.

You’ve got to watch this and see for yourself how bad it gets. Just when you think the segment has peaked, it expands the scope of its awfulness. Not just satisfied with comparing the traditional dances of Maori warriors (including those who welcomed former first lady Laura Bush during a visit to soldiers in Afghanistan) to Chippendales and horny emus, Moos gleefully highlights diplomats and world leaders “going native.”

Yeah, she actually said that.

So, how long does it take for CNN to transform into your weird, clueless right-wing relative who’s just discovered chain emails? About two minutes, it looks like. And if you need more, you’re in luck: CNN has a playlist available for your delectation called “The Wacky World of Jeanne Moos.”

***”Can you image people being active participants in their own cultures in their own lands? How utterly barbaric!”  -British Colonialism (representing cultural and literal genocide, rape, economic exploitation and theft since the 15th century)

****And its bastard offspring the American CNN reporter.

(Source: PolicyMic via @MarcKissel on Twitter)

Thank you CNN for finding a way to minimize an amazing honor and great ceremony.

oosik:

casethejointfirst:

oosik what kind of bear is this?

Note the erect posture. I believe this is the elusive ManBearPig. Also note how they cleverly omit the cloven hooves from being viewed.


I damn near pissed myself.

oosik:

casethejointfirst:

oosik what kind of bear is this?

Note the erect posture. I believe this is the elusive ManBearPig. Also note how they cleverly omit the cloven hooves from being viewed.

I damn near pissed myself.

oosik what kind of bear is this?

oosik what kind of bear is this?

A message from forcingit
Do you do autographs and photos and such after shows? I'm coming tonight and want to correctly place my hopes on the spectrum of artist hang-out-iness.
A reply from johndarnielle

These days I come out and sign stuff for sure, and I enjoy it more than I can say. It is great to say hello, I get a real boost from being able to really connect. I dislike having my picture taken; I end up consenting to pictures all the time, but I feel like I’m not being too too ornery of a person if I let people know how I actually feel, which is that I don’t like being photographed. I also get that people want pictures and that it’s sometimes important to them, so I want to be accommodating about it, because it’s in my nature to want to make people happy. So I figure a decent balance is to say, I’m up for it, theoretically, if it’s really important to you, but if my comfort’s of interest, the truth is I’ve hated being photographed all my life and wish there were some way of getting people to share my feeling that JD is best when there’s no pictures. 

JD handled my excitement at crossing his path in excellent fashion.

casethejointfirst:

givemesomesoma:




Tlaloc, Aztec god of rain, water, and fertility, usually shown with goggles.









I love the pose.

I did a little research on this statue because I was so fascinated about the seemingly nontraditional nature of the pose. Here’s what I found:
This statue is a product of the Totonac people, and was found at the El Zapotal site in modern-day Veracruz, Mexico. The statue has been interpreted as either Tlaloc or a young man in Tlaloc-like eye rings. From what I gleaned from some quick reading, the Totonac people were eventually subjugated by the Aztec but continued to mount insurrections until the fall of the Tenochtitlan, though I couldn’t find a date for the occupation of El Zapotal. An interesting side note is that the Totonac town of Cempoala was one of the first in Mesoamerica to encounter Cortés. Cempoala was one of the first places where Cortés was able to use the existing animosity of subjugated groups towards the Aztecs to his advantage.

casethejointfirst:

givemesomesoma:

Tlaloc, Aztec god of rain, water, and fertility, usually shown with goggles.

I love the pose.

I did a little research on this statue because I was so fascinated about the seemingly nontraditional nature of the pose. Here’s what I found:

This statue is a product of the Totonac people, and was found at the El Zapotal site in modern-day Veracruz, Mexico. The statue has been interpreted as either Tlaloc or a young man in Tlaloc-like eye rings. From what I gleaned from some quick reading, the Totonac people were eventually subjugated by the Aztec but continued to mount insurrections until the fall of the Tenochtitlan, though I couldn’t find a date for the occupation of El Zapotal. An interesting side note is that the Totonac town of Cempoala was one of the first in Mesoamerica to encounter Cortés. Cempoala was one of the first places where Cortés was able to use the existing animosity of subjugated groups towards the Aztecs to his advantage.

okkultmotionpictures:

EXCERPTS >|< Stone Age Tools (1947)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: Wellcome Library
 | Download: Ogg | 512Kb MPEG4 | MPEG4
 | Digital Copy: attribution-non commercial 3.0 US


A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Stone Age Tools, a demonstration by M. Leon Coutier, archaeologist and former President of the Societe Prehistorique Francaise, of his technique for making replicas of Palaeolithic tools and weapons, including hand-axes, scrapers, gravers and flint arrowheads. Filmed at the former Institute of Archaeology, Regent’s Park, London in June 1947. An important archeological record.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE.

history-in-pictures:

Alexander Peresvet at the Battle of Kulikovo by Pavel Ryzhenko

Alexander Peresvet  was a Russian Orthodox Christian monk who fought in a single combat with the Tatar champion Temir-murza (known in most Russian sources as Chelubey or Cheli-bey) at the opening of the Battle of Kulikovo (8 September 1380), where they killed each other.

The battle of Kulikovo was opened by single combat between the two champions. The Russian champion was Alexander Peresvet. The Horde champion was Temir-murza. The champions killed each other in the first run, though according to a Russian legend, Peresvet did not fall from the saddle, while Temir-murza did.

Peresvet’s body, together with that of his brother-in-arms Oslyabya, were brought to Moscow, where they lie buried at the 15th-century Theotokos Church in Simonovo

I wrote a paper during my undergraduate career about the rise of Muscovite Russia and the fall of Mongol rule. It’s a pretty intriguing time period.

softerworld:

A Softer World: 1090
(let’s turn those smiles upside-down)
buy this print

softerworld:

A Softer World: 1090

(let’s turn those smiles upside-down)

buy this print